Dec 12 2011

Fiction meeting reality

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I find this picture to be perfect in comparing it to Samperio’s story. Here we see the architect interacting with his creation. This is magical realism to the fullest.

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Dec 12 2011

Man in the Mirror

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In Gabriel Garcia Marquez story, a man seems to be intrigued with what he saw in the mirror. What is really in the mirror? Is it what you can’t control? or is it want you want to appear? Is it two different people? or in this case, cats?

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Dec 12 2011

movie within a movie

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Perfect in comparing to Samperio’s story. This is a movie were students are a part of a filming crew. They are constantly filming and acting out roles that are obviously not real. During the mist of movie making, their is a real killer out their, killing the members of the movie. Throughout the entire movie, we as the viewers are a part of this suspense and mystery. The last seen of the movie, the viewer finds out the entire movie you have just seen was a making of a movie. -_- This was not pleasant as I felt I was cheated out of my experience of watching a movie. This had many layers to point of view.

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Dec 12 2011

Perspective

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What a rush. Watching this video the viewer defiently gets a differient view. They feel like they are experiencing the action. This is an example of point of view.

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Dec 12 2011

How to believe a Static Character

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I found this interesting because it shows the perspective of a static character. We and the person that is being pranked, see death in the back. They thought they were going crazy when they saw him in the tv. Do we believe a static charcater as a reader/viewer?

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Nov 23 2011

Spanish Arrival

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sR8I1nicYWo

This scene portrays how the natives were baffled and amazed by the sight of the Spanish ships. You could see how two of the natives were pulled toward the unknown like gravity. It was smart of the other one to leave because the Spanish would end up decimating the native population. Through this movie, you can visualize many of the points made in Atomik Aztex like the rituals, tools, culture and family structure.

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Nov 23 2011

Automatically Unreliable

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And she said that she went into restaurants and before ordering said to the waiters: “Eyes of a blue dog.” But the waiters bowed reverently, without remembering ever having said that in their dreams. Then she would write on the napkins and scratch on the varnish of the tables with a knife: “Eyes of a blue dog.”

This woman appears obsesed with him and is an unreliable narrator. Her rendering of the story and/or commentary on it the reader has reasons to suspect. Any narrator that is in the unconscious is unreliable. They are delusional and vulnerable.

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Nov 23 2011

Two different types of magical realism

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After reading “She lived in a Story”, I can how it follows the outline of Campbells’ Famous Hero’s Journey. Garcia Marquez’s collected stories are more difficult to decipher and pattern. Why is that? Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey is the classic example of story and discourse. There is always a hero or antagonist in a story but how it is told, is what makes the discourse. The “story” can be viewed as the blue print of every movie, performance, and work of literature. It can also be described as a list of events. In my opinion, almost every story in a genre is the same. For example, what is the typical story in a romance? Boy meets girl. Boy likes girl. Girl does not like boy. Boy does something heroic to win over girl. Girl likes boy. Discourse is what makes the story unique. It is the way in which the events are depicted and reshaped in their employment. Without discourse, the world as we know it would come to an end. It would drive people insane to read or view the same thing over and over again.

I would even go as far as saying Campbell’s Hero’s Journey is the outline of the story in a movie, performance, or work of literature. In typical movies a hero must first receive a call to embark on a quest into the unknown. This is the first step in the separation or departure stage. The refusal of the call is what follows next. The hero maybe confused or unwilling to confront his/her problem. I do not completely agree with the next step which is the supernatural aid. Although in mainstream stories, the hero usually receives outside help but I don’t believe it is always from the supernatural. What’s to follow is what I like to call: where the action begins. The crossing of the threshold is the point in the story where the hero actually enters the sphere of adventure, leaving behind the safety and comfort of home, to undertake the dark realm where the rules and limits are not known. Once the hero leaves, they begin to be constantly tested which is called the Trials & Victories of Initiation. The hero must of course prove they are worthy to the reader. Typically the hero fails in the beginning, but it is just part of their learning process. Soon after, the hero meets their destine partner in life, their love of their life (Yes even hero’s need love). The next step in Campbell’s Hero’s Journey is something that can be thought as final fight. Campbell calls it Atonement with the father. He uses father probably due to the fact the protagonist is usually an older male figure. When defeating or surpassing the villain, the hero accomplishes its goal, referred to The Ultimate Boon. In my opinion, the return & reintegration with society is the most important stage in the outline of Hero’s Journey. If the reader/audience has a good feeling toward the hero upon his /her return, it was a successful discourse. Freedom to live is the stage where we get to compare our hero at the end, to how he/she was in the beginning. We see the differences in personality, strengths, and maybe even in confidence.

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Nov 23 2011

Narrative Modes

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He smiled. (It smiled.) He showed-to himself-his tongue. (It showed-to the real one-its tongue.) The one in the mirror had a pasty, yellow tongue: “Your stomach is upset,” he diagnosed (a wordless expression) with a grimace. He smiled again. (It smiled again.) But now he could see that there was something stupid, artificial, and false in the smile that was returned to him. He smoothed his hair (it smoothed its hair) with his right hand (left hand), returning the bashful smile at once (and disappearing). – Dialogue with the Mirror

I found this part of the story to be very interesting. In this passage we see both the showing and the telling modes of narration.Jahn states:

N5.3.1. The main narrative modes(or ways in which an episode can be presented) basically follow from the frequential and durational relationships identified above. First, however, let us make the traditional distinction between ‘showing’ and ‘telling’ (often correlated with ‘mimesis’ and ‘diegesis’, respectively):

  • showing In a showing mode of presentation, there is little or no narratorial mediation, overtness, or presence. The reader is basically cast in the role of a witness to the events.
  • telling In a telling mode of presentation, the narrator is in overt control (especially, durational control) of action presentation, characterization and point-of-view arrangement.

The narrator tells the action, then you see the action. What up with this?

 

 

 

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Nov 23 2011

The “What makes it ” game

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During class discussion, we have argued what makes a “good” book and what makes a good author. Is a book appealing when it is difficult to read? or does that take away the literary value of it? Authors like Salvador Plascencia take reading literature to an entire different level. Instead of reading the traditional style prose, his novel consist of the combinations of columns, pictures, cross-outs, words fading, stanzas, graffiti, black boxes, landscape text and so much more unique styles. What type of effect does this have on the reader? Is the reader more intrigued or frustrated with the text? It all depends I would say. Another “difficult” author of the 21st century would be David Foster Wallace.

Wallace’s novels often combine various writing modes or voices, and incorporate jargon and vocabulary (sometimes invented) from a wide variety of fields. His writing featured self-generated abbreviations and acronyms, long multi-clause sentences, and a notable use of explanatory footnotes and endnotes—often nearly as expansive as the text proper. He used endnotes extensively in Infinite Jest and footnotes in “Octet” as well as in the great majority of his nonfiction after 1996. On the Charlie Rose show in 1997, Wallace claimed that the notes were used to disrupt the linearity of the narrative, to reflect his perception of reality without jumbling the entire structure. He suggested that he could have instead jumbled up the sentences, “but then no one would read it.”[28]

According to Wallace, “fiction’s about what it is to be a fucking human being,” and he expressed a desire to write “morally passionate, passionately moral fiction” that could help readers “become less alone inside.”[29] In his Kenyon College commencement address, he describes the human condition of daily crises and chronic disillusionment and warns against solipsism,[30] invoking compassion, mindfulness, and existentialism:[31]

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